Dsylexia / Dysgraphia – Do we still need to use handwriting?

Do we still need to use handwriting ?

Dyslexia / Dysgraphia – Do we still need to use handwriting ?

Do we still need to continue to use handwriting?

We have known for years that handwriting improves motor skills, memory etc. Whilst it is important that we continue teaching handwriting, if a student with dyslexia or dysgraphia, still cannot write properly after adequate training; and he has reached 11/12 years of age, I personally believe, we should just them use a keyboard. This is also fully supported by a lot of academics.

Further information:
New York Times
3rd June 2014
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/03/science/whats-lost-as-handwriting-fades.html?smid=fb-share

Dyslexia , , ,

Do you forget things easily? Dyslexic people can be helped with brain training

Do you forget things easily? A sweet treat may help! In a recent study, participants who drank two cups of cocoa a day for a month performed better on memory tests. FMRI scans showed that the cocoa drinkers also had increased blood flow to the brain. This research adds to a growing body of evidence that blood distribution in the brain plays a vital role in thinking and memory. Do you enjoy the health benefits of chocolate? Share this post with friends and let us know in the comments. </p><br /><br />
<p>Read more here: http://bbc.in/13rjFxBDo you forget things easily?

I believe people with dyslexia can be helped with brain training.  And seems other people do too, read more .

A sweet treat may help! In a recent study, participants who drank two cups of cocoa a day for a month performed better on memory tests. FMRI scans showed that the cocoa drinkers also had increased blood flow to the brain.

This research adds to a growing body of evidence that blood distribution in the brain plays a vital role in thinking and memory. Do you enjoy the health benefits of chocolate? Share this post with friends and let us know in the comments.

Lumosity

Read more »

Brain Training, Dyslexia

Dyslexia – I’m Not Marking This Mess, I can see his face ready to blow

Dyslexia

I’m Not Marking This Mess

I can see his face ready to blow
he shouts so the whole class will know
‘Sir, Sir I’m stuck, I need more time.’
‘I told you what to do, don’t step out of line’.
I find it hard and embarrassing with him yelling
about my reading writing and spelling.
‘Hurry up, get on with it, I’m not marking this mess’
I say, ‘I need more time, I’m doing my best’.

He tells me little kids can do better than me
‘I’ve seen better from my daughter, she’s only three
where’s your full stops and capital letters?
now go and sit down until you do better.’

It’s hard to do my work I find
I never rest, it’s always on my mind
then I get frustrated, rude and angry
because he doesn’t understand me.

By Mark (12),
Severely Dyslexic

 

Dyslexia

Tests – UK came 21st out of 24 Countries. This is a disgrace!

Numeracy test 16 to 24-year-olds

This first OECD Skills Outlook presents the initial results of the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC), which evaluates the skills of adults in 24 countries. It provides insights into the availability of some of the key skills and how they are used at work and at home. A major component is the direct assessment of key information-processing skills: literacy, numeracy and problem solving in the context of technology-rich environments.

  1. Netherlands
  2. Finland
  3. Japan
  4. Flanders (Belgium)
  5. South Korea
  6. Austria
  7. Estonia
  8. Sweden
  9. Czech Republic
  10. Slovak Republic
  11. Germany
  12. Denmark
  13. Norway
  14. Australia
  15. Poland
  16. Canada
  17. Cyprus
  18. Northern Ireland
  19. France
  20. Ireland
  21. England
  22. Spain
  23. Italy
  24. United States

Source: OECD Survey of Adult Skills 2013

Dyslexia

England’s young adults trail world in literacy and maths

Despite decades of rising exam results, young adults have shown little progress

Young adults in England have scored among the lowest results in the industrialised world in international literacy and numeracy tests.

A major study by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) shows how England’s 16 to 24-year-olds are falling behind their Asian and European counterparts.

England is 22nd for literacy and 21st for numeracy out of 24 countries.

The OECD’s Andreas Schleicher warned of a shrinking pool of skilled workers.

Unlike other developed countries, the study also showed that young people in England are no better at these tests than older people, in the 55 to 65 age range.

When this is weighted with other factors, such as the socio-economic background of people taking the test, it shows that England is the only country in the survey where results are going backwards – with the older cohort better than the younger. Read more »

Dyslexia

Dyslexia – Europe’s largest special educational needs show, London. 11 & 12 Oct.

Europe’s largest special educational needs show
Friday 11th & Saturday 12th October 2013

Dyslexia – TES, Special Needs, London, Business Design Centre, Islington.  NW1 0QHE. 

Free entry. Register on-line (saves loads of time on the day). Read more »

Dyslexia

‘Afternoon naps’ aid children’s learning

Getting young children to take an hour-long nap after lunch could help them with their learning by boosting brain power, a small study suggests.

A nap appeared to help three-to-five-year-olds better remember pre-school lessons, US researchers said.University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers studied 40 youngsters and report their findings in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The benefit persisted in the afternoon after a nap and into the next day. Read more »

Child Development

Music – Moving to the rhythm ‘can help language skills’

Moving in time to a steady beat is closely linked to better language skills, a study suggests.

People who performed better on rhythmic tests also showed enhanced neural responses to speech sounds.

The researchers suggest that practising music could improve other skills, particularly speech.

In the Journal of Neuroscience, the authors argue that rhythm is an integral part of language.

“We know that Read more »

Child Development

Supporting students with dyslexia: tips, tricks and tech for teachers

1.2 million children in the UK have dyslexia so it’s important teachers understand how to support pupils with the disability. David Imrie shares his techniques and insights

1.2 million children in the UK have dyslexia, a print disability where students have difficulty reading and interpreting meaning. For them, though words are visible, they may swim or dance on the page and this can seriously affect their studies and performance. But with the right support from their teachers and the use of technology, simple changes can make a big difference. Read more »

Dyslexia

A new typeface for dyslexics

Richard Branson

Richard-Branson-signs-the NBC guest book in New York

When I was younger, dyslexia was poorly understood and people who suffered with it were often excluded rather than encouraged.

Even as consensus about dyslexia changed, teachers and businesses still didn’t know what to do to help dyslexics. This has gradually changed and now dyslexia is a condition thousands of people live and thrive with.

One new tool that could help dyslexics is a new typeface – Dyslexie – that has been designed specifically to help dyslexics read more easily. Researchers in the Netherlands found that Dyslexie reduced the likelihood of reading errors by making letters appear more unique to dyslexics.

Does it work for you? Watch the video above to find out more and let us know what you think.

(Please click on the link below to take you through to the video .)

Dyslexie ’the new typeface for dyslectics’

Regardless of whether Dyslexie is the answer for you, it is possible to turn dyslexia into a positive rather than a negative. I learned to focus on the things I was good at and delegate other tasks, a skill that set me in good stead to develop the whole Virgin Group. Having dyslexia means having to trust others to help you with tasks or do them on your behalf – this ability to let go is vital for entrepreneurs.

By . Founder of Virgin Group
5th September 2013

Dyslexia